Olympian’s to Entrepreneurs, Paige Lawrence & Arianne Jones

GUEST CONVERSATIONS

March 16, 2021

When we were all helping each other. We all got better. We all got better results. So results were improved. But so who was morale I gained friendships through those competitions, being competitors, doesn’t mean that there can’t be respect there for one another in your words and your actions.

 

 

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Olympian’s to Entrepreneurs, Paige Lawrence & Arianne Jones

Susanne 

Welcome to Pointe To Rise, your podcast. Today I am sharing with you a conversation that I have had with Paige Lawrence and Arianne Jones. They are both Olympic athletes, and we are talking about the new program they are launching. We’re talking all about their experience in their previous experiences and careers. And what the Why? Is why are they helping other athletes right now? Short bio, Paige competed in pairs figure skating at the 2014 Olympics, 21 international competitions medaling at several. A four-time Canadian bronze medalist and currently dedicated to helping entrepreneurs unlock their potential and achieve outstanding results by avoiding burnout. Through her Olympic career, Paige learned firsthand the exact mindset and skillset required for optimal performance. However, she also knew how a high-performance job could mentally cut a career short. She’s now passionate about helping others achieve high performance, so their new businesses can achieve or fulfill audacious goals and feel fulfilled without sacrificing their physical or mental health and happiness. Arianne Jones competed in the 2014 Olympics, 15 World Cups, 5 World Champs, and won two World Cup medals. Her Olympic career came with a decade of overcoming naysayers who told her that she would never amount to anything overtraining and finally breaking her back, which was the catalyst to discovering the power of nutrition. After coming back eight months later, to win gold, and became obsessed with the untapped potential behind what is at the end of our fork and the power of our mindset. She blends her experience with the science of nutrition and the art of healthy eating to empower people to walk their unique path to optimal health to live better, more fulfilled, and inspired lives. She walks the walk, and she uses these skills for five days today while battling chronic illnesses. So without any further ado without adding anything else, guys have a listen to this episode. It is fire. Hello ladies, and welcome to the podcast. I am so delighted to have you here.

Arianne

Thank you. We are thrilled to hang out with you today.

Paige 

And happy to be here.

Susanne 

Just in case you haven’t listened to the intro. I am here with Arianne and Paige, and we have two Olympic athletes here, and we’re talking all about mindset, the new things that you guys are doing, women empowerment. All right, ladies, let’s dive into your story first. I would love to share your incredible successes and your struggles and what you have learned, how you’ve gotten to the 24 teen Olympics, and all the good stuff. Who wants to start? Like I’m looking on my screen? Paige? Yeah,

Paige 

yeah, yeah, I can, I can happen. So I ended up competing in the Olympics as a pairs figure skater. So I started skating when I was four years old. And just quite simply because there was nothing else to do in the winter in a small town, Canada. And I ended up loving it. My parents were so supportive that they continuously found opportunities for me to grow, which was great. So it’s a straightforward start; when I was nine years old, I started training in a nearby town to where I grew up with a more high-performance coach, or so we’d been told. And that was the beginning of my competitive career; she was the coach that ended up taking my partner and me to the Olympics. I would have been like 15 years later, which is crazy. Oh, I enjoy skating on my own for the majority of my adolescent life. But when I was 15, I started skating pairs with a boy in my club named Rudy. And we had no clue what we were doing. My coach had never coached couples before, and we had never skated pairs. And we quite literally taught ourselves pair skating by watching VHS tapes, on the TV on the side of the board, like, and we’d be calling people that renewability like, does this look right? Kind of, sort of, are we on the right track here?  What do we do with this hand? It was very much a trial and error type of situation. But we just continued to create, to find solutions to whatever problem came up. And long story short, I guess we continued on our journey in a way that was true to us. We trained pretty much full time in our small town until we retired, an anomaly, and figure skating. And we competed in 2014 at the Olympics, which was my, my goal and of all goals. So that’s that career in a nutshell.

Susanne 

Wow. So you target that is like the essence of being an entrepreneur, quite honestly, in my opinion, not being scared to fail. Like, who cares? I’m just going to learn this from a VHS, and we’re going to do the best we can. We’re not going to judge ourselves. We’re going to end up at two Olympic Games.

Paige 

In our first year of competing, we would compete, and the other pairs of teams would be scared of being friendly with us, as the judges and coaches. Were all like, Oh my gosh, what do you guys do? It’s not that we were terrible. We just were a little bit unruly, our first year out there. But we just kind of kept going.

Arianne

To be clear, I’m not a figure skater. I, I don’t have the grace of figure skating. So my sport was luge. Which is kind of like being a professional toboggan, or that’s what it is. A lot of people, if you don’t know it loses, most people know, bobsled, right where they’re in a sled, and they go down that like frozen water slide down the side of a mountain. That’s my sport, except instead of being in it by myself. I laid on my sled on my back feet first. Wow. So that was my sport, but because luge is so again, I started quite young, a typical story about 12 years old, though it was so much fun, got to try it at a camp and wanted to get involved. And as I was moving through the ranks being younger, you know, I was learning the typical beginning of a sports story. Once I hit that age, though, about 16 years old, I remember being told that I didn’t belong there. And that’s because of my body type and my size. So luge is a gravity sport, which means the heavier you are, the faster you’re going to go. Right. I like to give the example of if you were at the top of a hill and you had a bowling ball and a golf ball, and you push them both down the hill, you know which ones get into the bottom first, right? However, the bowling ball in this story is on the golf ball, so I am not a very big person. I’m not very tall. During those formative teenage years, even though I was having great success traveling the world competing, I was starting to be told by everyone in positions of power that You need to get bigger. Your body’s not right for the sport, and you’re never going to make it to the national team, you’re never going to make the Olympics, you’re never going to win a medal, that’s for sure. You’re just not right; you might as well quit, which was pretty tough to handle for sure. I refocused and decided to believe in myself, not believe the voices on the outside, and focused on controlling all of the pieces I could control. You know, I couldn’t make myself six inches taller. I either stress about that all day, or I could let it go? And so I let go of all those pieces I couldn’t control, and I doubled down on the ones I could, being a better driver having a faster start working harder than everybody else being mentally stronger than everybody else. And Fast Forward spoiler, everyone here already knows I went to the Olympics, team, I’ve competed in 50 World Cups, five World Championships, and then the Olympics in 2014. and accomplish all of those goals that everybody told me would never be possible for me because of who I was. And so after about 2014, I’m getting an air High Five from Paige is the best. I wish everybody could see the zoom. Everyone’s having a little dance moment, which is great. After about 2014, after the Olympics, you know, I’d compete at the Olympics and won my first medal. I was really on a high of like, okay, I found my groove, right? Like, this is my path. Now I’m feeling good about it, and I feel like I belong. And then I broke my back. And that was a career pivoting injury. For me, I was very scary, very overwhelming. I didn’t know if I’d ever been able to do my sport again. The doctors told me for 12 weeks, all I could do was pretty much go to physio and be in the ice tub and lay down until they could tell me if I could do my sport again. And that was one of the key times for me. It was super pivotal in my life on I did a 180 pretty much on everything. On my mental game. On the team, I surrounded myself, from physios, doctors, and trainers to just the people I surrounded myself with their energy. How I trained, I learned how to trust my gut and be confident in myself. What I ate and was super mind-blowing for me how much all those differences make. And eight months later, I ended up coming back and winning my first gold medal, which winning a gold medal any day is a great day. But having overcome and just knowing the lowest lows that I’d gone through to get there was an emotional moment for me. Again, I thought I was found my groove back again and was feeling good. And then, like threw me another curveball. And I got mysteriously sick and ended up having to retire, not really on my terms. And you know, fast forward, I ended up finding out about four years later that I had Lyme disease. And so that was another pivot in my life. All these pivots led me to holistic nutrition, becoming a chef, becoming obsessed with food and mindset and wellness and health, and all of those pieces, and is why Paige and I were working together.

All these pivots led me to holistic nutrition, becoming a chef, becoming obsessed with food and mindset and wellness and health, and all of those pieces, and is why Paige and I were working together. Click To Tweet

Susanne 

Arianne, you repeatedly were told that you’re not a fit for this sport; you just don’t fit into this box. What made you decide that you are going to do it anyways, like, because when we’re in those, those formative years, it is hard to have that self-confidence and that self-awareness that okay, whatever is telling me and whoever is telling me from the outside, I can’t screw you. I’m going to do it anyway, and it takes a lot of courage. You who have that kind of a mindset. Where did that courage come to arise?

Arianne 

I mean, it’s a tough question. Because, of course, looking back now, I was also only 16, right? I wish I had more journals of that time of what I was thinking and writing. I think about it a lot. Is it a question of nature versus nurture? I guess on one piece like I give a lot of credit to Well, everyone in the sport didn’t Believe in me, my parents did, and they were very supportive. So I’m very grateful to have had that support team pushing me to try my best and fight. I, you know, clearly some of it, I think was innately in me of being a fighter of I have a little bit in me when someone tells me I can’t do something, I had a bit of a watchmaker mentality. Like, don’t underestimate me. Which I still have now. But I think, but I don’t want that for people listening to think, oh, if I don’t innately have that in me, I can’t make that courageous choice because I don’t believe that either. I think there’s a key question Paige and I talk about a lot, which is asking yourself, but what if the opposite was true? At that moment, many people from the outside were telling me you’re not the right size for this. And I think I just stopped and said, but what if the opposite was true? Right? What? What if you’re working with a limited amount of facts? What if, while I might not be six feet tall, I am mentally stronger here? What if I can work harder than other people? What if I’m more aerodynamic than other people? Those questions fueled my belief in myself, for anyone with that goal, or that dream or that passion? I do think like, you got to believe in yourself. 100%? Because if you don’t, how is anybody else going to like you have to double down on yourself.

Paige 

Also, I believe that something that elite athletes do almost underestimate the power it. But something that we do is that we establish these apparent goals, right, like Arianne had a vision of where she wanted to go. Like her reason behind that, her why was always more significant than the excuses not to write. It essential to note that anything worth doing, there will always be a million exit signs, there will always be opportunities left, right, and center for you to walk away from it to find to believe in the reason to not, that’s not going to work. And I think that to create that long-lasting success. You have to get good at not focusing on the exit science but concentrate on finding your way forwards, letting your y be more significant than the excuses. And I think that I mean, listening to Arianne talk, and we’ve talked about the parallels of our journeys. I think that’s a piece of it, too. Would you say area as I bought into your story? No.

Arianne

I mean, you know? Absolutely. Having a clear why for anything you’re pursuing is important, Paige and I clearly understand why now on everything we’re seeking. And it’s a part that we’re both of us think it’s imperative in teaching and everyone we work within the course we have had that clear why because if your y is strong enough, you can overcome a lot of suffering and struggles if you’re clear on that way.

Susanne 

You can overcome everything. If your why is very clear why you can overcome any circumstance, any type of flaw that you may think or use as an excuse for not to, you can overcome all of that. I believe that arts groups are missing this point, and as a result, they struggle so much. Okay, Paige, I have not yet heard why you stopped and how?

Paige 

Yeah, yeah, I was listening. I was like, I cut that part of my story. Um, so I would say that the last few years of my career were a little bit of a struggle. It was I was the athlete that prided myself on being a workhorse. So my solution to everything throughout my career was, well, try harder. I’ll just do more reps. I’ll just spend more time on the ice, and it worked for a certain period. That point in my career where I was almost self-sacrificing too much of my health. Too much of my body. Too much of myself. Too much to my partner. Too much of my team just to the goal. And so, the last two to three years, I felt like my body was continually fighting injury in what I was doing.

I experienced a little bit of burnout after a significant concussion. And so when I went to the Olympics, it’s a beautiful moment. I would say that my Olympic experience. It was the first time that I indeed let myself show up. When I competed as just full-on Paige Lawrence, I stopped worrying about being perfect, and I stopped worrying about doing anything and everything that made my partner happy. And it was, if not the best two performances of my entire career. So it was this stunning realization for me that I wanted to continue feeding off and continuing to grow my career. But for many reasons, my relationship with my partner wasn’t working; we had come to a fork in the road, we both wanted different things moving forwards, and we just could not, like, recreate an alignment in our goals. And so and that alongside like, my body was screaming at me to take some time away, it just the decision was made somewhat a little bit out of my control, that I didn’t have a partner, and it was probably time for me to step away from the sport. So that was a bit of a rough blow. For me, it’s a low moment in my life, coming right off of the highest of highs. I think I’ve used that time following my athletic career to almost take that thread of what I learned at the Olympics. Preparation, being ready to execute at the moment and allowing myself to show up with, like, protected boundaries and proud of myself and this ownership of who I am, and that I am enough. And I’ve taken that, and I’ve started to explore it, through life experiences, you know, not just in sport. All of those experiences slowly led me to this interest in the mindset and the brain, helping other people pursue their goals in a way that is authentically fulfilling to them. Other people can have their Olympic moment and so that they can experience just the joy that it takes to persevere through everything that it takes to be successful. And enjoy the ride. As corny as that sounds. And that’s, yeah, that’s, that’s it. That’s why I’m a performance coach now, and I love what I do.

Susanne 

Wow, thank you for that. There’s so much in there that we could go. I am happy that you had that moment where you could just let go of everything we usually use as anchors. And one thing that keeps us where we feel safe because we’re so worried about you to know, everybody else but ourselves.

Paige 

yeah, it was. It was like, I mean, it was like a moment of permission. When I went to the Olympics, it was permission to show up as myself fully and to like, prioritize my needs, which sounds maybe a little bit selfish. But it was, it shows that when you can show up as your best self like my partnership, we stayed at our best, right, rather than all the time, I’d spent other years trying to be something for my partner trying to change who I was in, to help him. And really, it was a great learning experience, maybe a little too late.

Susanne 

Oh, wow. Here we talk about women empowerment. I am sitting in front of two potent women energies for everybody who’s just listening and not watching the video. And this could go two ways for me. I can either let that affect me by allowing myself to shrink and saying, Oh, you guys are so pretty. And you know, having all of these doubts coming up, or I give myself permission to step into that same energy and feed off of this. Okay. I used to be that first version of what I just described for many, many years because I never experienced women as or powerful women as helpful. I always was scared of them. I was always intimidated. I was triggered, and I didn’t know how to deal with it or how to make it work for me, you know? Can you talk about like in competitive in the competitive field that we’re all in at one point or another in our life? How did you circuit not circum but over these kinds of relationships, mainly when we’re talking about between women?

Arianne

To get started, I have one story; actually, that cemented this in my mind. So when I was competing in luge, So to be clear, it’s, it’s a solo sport, right? I’m all by myself on that sled. However, when you’re on the national team, you travel with a team.  Team Canada means there are usually four men, four women, a few doubles teams; let’s call like eight to 15 people on that team. Now, those four women that are on the team, we all compete in the same world cup. On the same day, we are direct competitors to each other. We all want the same goal. And we are completely direct competitors to each other, except we’re also on this team together. In my first year on the national team, I was on a junior national, and I had been on a team with women, where again, I was 16 to 18 years old. And we fell into that trap of what society tells us where it’s like women, and you got to be each other’s biggest competitors. And we weren’t that nice to each other, and there was a lot of mind games, there was a lot of cattiness behind the scenes because that’s what society teaches us growing up as women that you’re supposed to do, right. And we, so I had experienced that life. And I saw how daily I was miserable and didn’t feel right. And it brought all of us down. So then fast forward next year, and I make the national team. And the two other girls that I was on the national team with, we had all had that experience of being with other women where we broke each other down. And we didn’t like it one bit. And we thought there’s must be another way here. And we all decided to take a 180 on that. And say, okay, we’re already out here away from home, we have no one we love around us. And we already have 40 other international women here that are our direct competitors. Wouldn’t it be nice for the three of us to be like, what would happen if we lifted each other? But yes, on race day, we’re competitors. But what if we lifted each other? And so this came in not words, but actions? And words, I mean, both. So an example is for luge. You only get a certain amount of runs every week, depending on your ranking. And so you don’t need to get into the details. But here’s the story. I was allowed three training runs that day. And my teammate was allowed two training runs that day. And she finished her second run, and she was getting dressed. And I still had another run. She came up to me, and she said, Where are you having trouble on the track? I’ll run down super quickly and watch you there so that I can help you figure it out as like another set of eyes and another coach. She didn’t have to do that. She could have just sat and finished her day. Right. And it helped me so much. And her actions then showed the same thing. So on different days, when I had extra time, I would help her. We all started to talk about technique together, and we would watch each other start and help. And the magical thing that happens is that we all got better. When all of the women were tearing each other down, no one got better. We all got worse. When we were all helping each other, we all got better. We all got better results. Our results improved. But so was our morale. I gained friendships through those competitions; being competitors doesn’t mean that there can’t be respect for one another in your words and actions.

Susanne 

I have goosebumps everywhere. That’s such a beautiful story. Thank you for sharing that.

Paige 

Yeah, and I think I’ll just add to that, too, because similarly, we trained in the middle of nowhere. We trained by ourselves, my partner, and me. And every year, we would train part-time in Florida and a pair training center because we wanted to be around our competitors. We wanted to see what they were doing. We tried to put ourselves in that scenario where we could then push ourselves to be better. And it was a choice. Our first couple times down there like I definitely felt nervous, and I felt a little bit of that imposter syndrome and felt less than, and then I realized that it was a choice, I got to show up and add to that environment.  When I started doing that, it became magical.  I was around many pairs of couples. We would be chucked across the ice by our partners. You get dropped on her head from six feet above the boy’s head. We are a tough breed of women. And we’d be on the ice cheering for each other, not like loud, like aggressive like hand-clapping when someone would do something good because if she’s doing good, I’m more determined to also go out and to be a badass. And so, like we chose to create the environment where companies make you better. And I think that that’s what people need to recognize, like two points here. You can choose for a competition to make you feel less than you can select your match to take away from you. Or you can choose to grow and learn because of your competition like both those scenarios are on you. So I think you can control that. And I also want to suggest that you can also create boundaries because I can’t change anyone else. And if I’m not liking how you’re adding to my environment, if I don’t like how you’re treating me, I can establish my boundary and say, that doesn’t work for me, I don’t need to be around you, and move on and find somebody else who makes you feel better. That’s something that I did time and time again is there’s always going to be people that were not on the same vibe of making each other better empower. That’s how I reach. That’s how I reacted to people. That’s how I treated everyone. But I also just separated myself. And I found other people to also empower me. So there’s a choice in who you’re around also.

Susanne 

Oh, this is beautiful. Thank you. Two things that are standing out here that I’m getting from both of you that I personally think to make a world of difference. One is to ask different questions. And you don’t have to surrender your circumstances. You can turn them around by asking additional questions. What if? It is such a powerful phrase to use on every possible occasion that you’re in to turn it around. And the second one is, we always have a choice. You need a choice genuinely, we have an option to be the victim or the hero, and it is still on us and nobody else out there. And that goes for Olympic athletes just as much as it goes for dancers or any kind of other artists, human beings, women, men, whatever that is, whoever is listening right now, you always have a choice.

 

Arianne

Yeah. And, it really does come down to choosing to be an active participant in your life. If it’s your career goals, if it’s your, you know, the cards you’re dealt, if it’s taking back control of your health, if it’s your surroundings, like you, you always have the choice to actively show up for yourself and ask new questions and make recent decisions.

Paige 

That’s actually a significant component of the course that we’ve built together is. Is Yeah, we’re looking at your mindset. We’re helping you create a strong foundation in your mindset. And we’re helping you create a strong foundation in your nutrition and lifestyle because all of those things impact how you show up every day. The biggest takeaway we want for people is for them to realize that they are capable of showing up as active participants in their own life, and they are capable of so much more than what they can imagine right now. You know, and I think that when Arianne and I talk a lot, it’s always around that we want to empower people to show up and to fully be present and make decisions every day to promote them being their best.

Susanne 

So good. Yes, let’s talk about your course. I want to have a little bit deeper and up, not only on how it’s going, how it’s working, or what modules you have in there. I also want to know, I mean, you talked a little bit about the why, but I feel like more behind it because you’re not just coming up with I’m going to go on empower people because that’s, that’s my new passion. There’s more about that. That comes from something much more profound. And I’d love for you to share that because that is what makes the difference.

Paige 

Yeah, so I think one of the things jokes aside being although it sounds funny, is Arianne and I want to change the world for the better like that’s a significant motivating factor. We want to do it in a way that addresses the way of life that has been normalized in this burnout-driven culture. That was the norm in sport, and we both saw firsthand the effects that this whatever it takes mentality, the tools It takes on the lifespan of a career and the lifespan of our body and our mental health. And we see that in the entrepreneur world, we see that in the corporate world, you see that with like moms trying to do absolutely everything. And we want to help people realize that it doesn’t have to be that way. Like they can, you can achieve a successful life in a way that actually feels good. Because when you feel your best mentally, physically, you’re able to do your best work. And when everyone is doing their best work, the world is a better place. Well, I think that’s one of the reasons why we’re building this course, Arianne, anything to add.

Arianne 

No, that’s awesome. And yeah, I love how perfectly you put that. But that’s exactly it, you know, we want exactly, to show people to use our own light and our own experience and our own knowledge to wake that light up or help it shine brighter in each person. Because then it’s the ripple effect. And again, they can go and achieve their dreams goals, you know, show up and have that ripple effect in their families, in their communities, in their companies. I think it’s also notable because both Paige and I know what it feels like to feel. To have the pillars underneath us of self-confidence, which is a big one from sport, right, showing up to a scary situation, a challenging situation and tense situation, with self-confidence and belief in self. The other pillar of what it feels like to have the strength to know that whatever curveball comes your way, you got this, you’re gonna be able to hand this handle this, you got tools in your toolbox. And the other pillar of when you’re fueling your body with really great food. You feel good, you feel energized, like no more, you know, those things are normalized again, burnt out headaches every day, body feeling out of whack. When you can know how good you can feel. Your change that you can make in the world or the things you can accomplish is exponential. So we know what it feels like to stand in strength on those three pillars. We also know that you don’t have to be a superhuman to have those pillars underneath you. Those tools are learnable; they’re teachable, and they’re absolutely doable.

Susanne 

Oh, good. Okay, let’s get into the nitty-gritty. When are you launching?  How can people sign up?

Paige 

Cart opens March 14, and it closes March 27. Because the course begins March 28. We’ll be doing some master classes throughout those two weeks between the 14th and 27th that we’d love for people to join. And we’ll send you a link to Susanne that you can share with people. Otherwise, follow us on Instagram. We can also share links for that to kind of keep in touch and follow along.

Arianne 

Yeah, in our Instagram profiles, we’ll have links that lead to signing up for the waitlist signing up for the master class where we teach some of these concepts. You can get to know Paige and me a bit better. And you know, tell you about some of the vast and fantastic bonuses we have on the course. And as well, we’ll give all those links to Susanne to put in the podcast notes. So that you can find us and come be awesome.

Susanne 

So here’s what I sometimes find, particularly for people who are starting to build up their own worthiness, that they’re hesitant and actually investing in themselves because they don’t quite yet know what their return of investment could actually look like. I would love to share perhaps your own experiences around that and how you break through that fear.

Paige 

Yeah, that’s a great point. And I can totally relate to it both in figure skating and as an entrepreneur. We have to make these significant investments to level up our abilities. I know that doesn’t mean that I don’t still feel that resistance and fear.  Whenever I go to do it pulls up all those limiting beliefs, Gremlins. The negative self-confidence from ones like, oh, but what if you’re not enough. What if you waste this opportunity, and what if, what if? What if, right? We’ve all been there. We all know those Gremlins have been really nasty voices. And for myself, it’s I always kind of have to give myself this like moment of tough talk to say, hey, again, if we don’t have a choice, hey, which side of you? Do you want to get the energy to right now? Do you want to give energy to those little Gremlins that are telling you you are not capable? It’s not the right thing for you, you’re not a fit, you’re going to be a failure, you’re going to be embarrassing? Or do you want to give energy to the parts of you that believe you are worthy of this investment? Whenever I start focusing on that, it also opens up this competitive level within me.  That little bit that goes, when I invest this chunk of money when I commit to this, I am dang sure gonna show up, but the work effort in and make myself take myself to that next level, right? It’s like a challenge. And I think that that’s the powerful thing that happens when you invest in yourself is you’re betting on yourself, you’re saying, hey, you deserve this chance, go out there, do the work, and show yourself that you’re enough that you’re capable. So I don’t know if that’s helpful. But that’s what goes on in my little site.

Arianne 

And also, I want to add to that, you know, our courses 12 weeks, for a reason, to make a sustainable change so that you don’t just jump in. You know, all this, those crazy courses that are like, get this crazy thing in seven days, you know, that’s not sustainable, you’re just going to crash and burn on day eight and go right back to where you were on day zero. And our course is set up to bring this to life for you. And I think what’s powerful to remember is that if you can show up as an active participant in your life, for 12 weeks, three months, 90 days, whatever feels good to you. You can do a 180 on your life. You will not believe it if you invest in yourself and show up every day for that amount of time. You can make an incredible amount of progress and change by the end of that. Which I think is powerful to know, and why it was also crucial in our course. When people said, okay, hell yes, I’m going to invest in myself, let’s do this, Paige and Arianne. That we supported them with all of the tangible tools, checklists on how to bring everything to life, videos of us telling our stories, video lessons, audio lessons, workbooks, recipes, grocery lists, all of those pieces. Because the world of I sometimes think what happens in self-growth is you would get you’re like, Okay, I’m going to do this and you go and buy the book. And you read the book, and you think, Oh, yeah, that was good. That was interesting, but you don’t actually do the work.

You can actually make the changes, or you buy the cookbook, and you say, Oh, yeah, these recipes are good. We’re gonna eat more plant-based, you know, if that’s your goal, and you go, yep, made that choice. You took that first little step. And then you’ve never cracked that cookbook because you went well, I don’t know. And like, what are lentils? And how do I cook them and, and you get overwhelmed, and you just stop. And so that’s why it was necessary for our course for when people said, hell yes! We showed up with every step by step every tool, accountability, support, and coaching, to bring it to life.  So people so that that investment should feel when you go through the course like there was 20 times more value there for you.

Paige 

It is a 12-week timeframe. It is laid out in a way that’s not super daunting. So you’re actually getting to move through this whole process. Do these amazing things like set a powerful vision!  And the powerful bulls take back control of your self-talk, learn about the ins and outs of like, what healthy eating is, and how to manage your mood and energy throughout the day. We cut out refined sugar for 30 days, which sounds super scary. But Arianne walks you through it, I did it, and it was tricky but so doable. We talk about self-sabotage, and we help you through these big things. But it’s not daunting, because like we get it, we’re busy entrepreneurs. We’re not asking you to commit 10 hours a week to do these things. It’s all laid out in a way that’s manageable with your schedules. It’s designed to give you back more time to take off stress from your plate. And to make you feel better throughout all of it. So I think, you know, a bit biased because we made it up late. We laid it out in a way that is that will set you up for success.

Susanne 

Beautiful. So you’re cutting out most of the resistance that we feel when we step into a change when we’re coming up higher version of ourselves. Right. Awesome.

Paige 

One of the modules, in the beginning, is all about the cycle of change. Recognizing that it is cyclical and that there’s an actual process that you go through. And because knowledge is power, once you’re aware of this, you’re able to then plan for it proactively so that you learn about this early on. And then you practice it throughout the rest of our course. So we’re just continually building from different fundamentals.

Susanne 

Well, ladies, I have one last question, um, with everything you have learned Now, what is one thing you would tell your 16-year-old self right now?

Paige 

Gosh, that’s a good question.

Arianne 

I have to think about it now. That’s a great question.  I would tell my 16-year-old self to bet on yourself because you are so much more capable than you even believe you are so much more capable than any of those limits others or society is placing on you. And when you do bet on yourself and show up, show up as you authentically as you don’t try and be anybody else.

Susanne 

Beautiful. I think we should do an episode around what it actually means to be authentic. By the way, ladies.

Paige 

I would tell my 16-year-old self that in this process of being so committed to my goals. Continue challenging myself and pushing myself. But in that process, to develop myself, love a little bit earlier on that, that I get to be a priority in my own journey in a way that I can accept myself a little bit more wholeheartedly. So authentic, fulfilling, like self-owning, Paige got to be a part of the journey for a little longer. And I don’t mean that lightly as in like the fluffy self-love, but like the nitty-gritty, the good and the bad, find ways to love yourself throughout at all, because I think it will only serve you. Well, in the long run.

Continue challenging myself and pushing myself. But in that process, to develop myself, love a little bit earlier on that, that I get to be a priority in my own journey in a way that I can accept myself a little bit more wholeheartedly. Click To Tweet

Susanne 

Oh, goosebumps everywhere. Thank you so much. This was like, Oh, my cherry on top of my day today. It was such a pleasure to talk to you and get your insights. So everything about both of you will be linked in the show notes. Don’t forget to check them out. And thank you so much, both of you, for what you’re doing in the world. I really, really appreciate it. I know you’re making a difference. And that really matters. Thank you.

Arianne 

We just want to say to anyone listening, reach out to us; we are approachable. Once people like we make connections, it’s like, we want to be a resource for you. We want to be in your corner cheering you on. And all it just takes us to reach out to say hi to get that conversation started. Exactly. Like send us a message on Instagram or a platform of your choice or send us an email through our websites. We love hearing from you. And even if you’re like, Hey, I’m a little curious, but I’m worried about X, Y, or Z.

Susanne 

Awesome. Thank you, my darlings. So good to see you. So good to talk to you.

So much ❤

Susanne

 Paige Lawrence

Paige competed in pairs figure skating at the 2014 Olympics, 21 International Competitions (medalling at several) and was the 4x Canadian Pairs Bronze medalist, and is now dedicated to helping entrepreneurs unlock their potential and achieve outstanding results while avoiding burnout.
Through her Olympic career, Paige learned firsthand the exact mindset and skill set that is required for optimal performance, however, she also learned how the “high-performance career at all costs” mentality can cut a rising career short.
She is now passionate about helping others achieve high-performance in their business, achieve their audacious goals, and feel fulfilled without sacrificing their physical and mental health and happiness.

Arianne Jones
Arianne competed in Luge at the 2014 Olympics, 50 World Cups, 5 World Champs, and won 2 World Cup medals. Her Olympic career was filled with a decade of overcoming naysayers who told her that she would never amount to anything, overtraining and finally, breaking her back, which was the catalyst to discovering the power of nutrition.
After coming back 8 months later to win Gold she became obsessed with the untapped potential behind what is at the end of our fork and the power of your mindset.
She blends her experiences with the science of nutrition and the art of healthy eating to empower people to walk their unique path to optimal health; to live better, more fulfilled, and inspired lives. She walks the walk as she uses these skills to thrive day to day while battling chronic illness.

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About Susanne Puerschel

Susanne Head shot

Susanne, Founder of Pointe To Rise, an Empowerment society for dancers and other artist, Wellness Entrepreneur, podcast host, former international ballerina and experienced principal chief executive officer had the privilege to grow up behind the iron curtain in Berlin, Germany.
She’s dedicating her time now, after working in cooperate America and running her own businesses, to building community among dancers and artist, providing mindset and high performance coaching and building a media company that will be the springboard to revitalizing the Arts.

👉 Follow Susanne on Instagram | Facebook 

 

REad More ⟶

  — Susanne shares a quick thought that came to her after hearing a quote. Who told you that you are not deserving of what you want? She remembers how this feeling showed up in her life and how other people’s limiting thoughts would so easily be accepted as hers. Watch the episode here: Listen to the podcast here:   Who told you that you are not deserving of what you want? And I’m back. […]

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Past Episodes 

There is a better way to pursue ballet at the professional level. Instead of dancers pushing beyond their body’s limits, there is a healthier way to train your body, your mind and your spirit to soar. To become the best at your craft, you must be healthy. The mentality of surviving to make a performance perfect is an old paradigm that needs to change. As athletes, dancers must thrive in order to shine and connect with their audience. This new approach, leads to fulfillment, strength and longevity. It allows you to give more of your heart and soul on stage, creating an unforgettable experience that moves your audience. And that’s the whole pointe. 

THE POINTE TO RISE MANIFESTO